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Introduction

Concern about community transmission of COVID-19 and application of appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) continues to be a key focus for the health system, with the safety of maternity patients and staff our priority. Maternity services should monitor the COVID-19 risk level and respond according to CEC COVID-19 Infection Prevention and Control Manual (Chapter 3 - Response and Escalation Framework). For the most up to date information on the transmission risk in healthcare settings within NSW, view the Risk Monitoring Dashboard
 
For pregnant women with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, continued access to woman-centred, respectful, skilled care and timely COVID-19 testing is essential. This also includes mental health and psychosocial support as well as clinical readiness to care for maternal and neonatal complications.

 

Districts and networks are expected to follow the Tiered Perinatal Networks’ Local Network Operational Plans when escalation of care is required as outlined in the NSW Health Policy Directive PD2020_014 Tiered Networking Arrangements for Perinatal Care in NSW

NSW Health Guidance for Neonatal Services is relevant to all postnatal wards, special care nurseries and neonatal intensive care units. 

Clinicians in maternity settings should also refer to the CEC Infection Prevention and Control Manual 
 

COVID-19 Vaccination

Pregnant women with COVID-19 have an increased risk of severe illness and adverse pregnancy outcomes.

Based on advice from the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) and the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG), pregnant women should be routinely offered the Pfizer or Moderna COVID-19 vaccine at any stage of pregnancy For more information see the COVID-19 Vaccine Eligibility Checker. The Pfizer and Moderna COVID-19 vaccines are preferred for women who are pregnant or breastfeeding due to the amount of safety data available. Moderna COVID-19 vaccination for pregnant women is now available in pharmacies across NSW.

If access to the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine is limited, pregnant or breastfeeding women may consider receiving the AstraZeneca vaccine if the benefits of vaccination outweigh the risks for that individual woman. The woman should speak with her general practitioner or relevant health professional about the best choice for her.

Further information is available in the Australian Government's shared decision-making guide for women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or planning pregnancy:   COVID-19 vaccination decision guide for women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or planning pregnancy

For more information go to COVID-19 vaccination: information for the NSW community (which also links to the Australian Government decision guide).

A COVID-19 vaccine can be co-administered (i.e. given on the same day) with an influenza vaccine. 

Routine administration of a COVID-19 vaccine on the same day as another vaccine, except for an influenza vaccine, can be done if required. However, there is currently limited evidence on the co-administration of a COVID-19 vaccine and other vaccines and so providers need to consider the need for co-administration and whether the vaccines can be given on separate visits. When vaccines are co-administered, there is the potential for an increase in mild to moderate adverse events. If co-administration or administration within a few days does occur, it could make it more difficult to attribute any adverse event that may arise.

   

Essential elements of maternity care

Pregnant women must continue to have access to maternity care throughout a pandemic. Health services will be required to review their usual service provision and models of care to respond to their local pandemic plans. Service redesign or changes to models of care must be accompanied by a robust risk assessment process to ensure there are no unintended adverse consequences of such changes.

The essential elements for maternity care that should be provided as a minimum by all services are outlined in Table 1 - Minimum essential elements for safe maternity care, noting the timeframes for delivery of these elements are approximate and may slightly differ within each service. Note that there is scope for additional service provision to these essential elements, taking into consideration the importance of individualised care, staff and patient safety and the local context. 

Local antenatal care pathways should consider that nulliparous women and other women with risk factors may require additional visits at 24 weeks, 32-34 weeks and 38 weeks. This provides the opportunity for the timely detection and management of pregnancy complications e.g. pre-eclampsia and fetal growth restriction. 

NSW Health has been working with the Government insurer, iCare, and where staff act professionally and in accordance with mandated guidelines, policy or lawful directions of their employer, they will be indemnified. Changes to service delivery during the COVID-19 pandemic should be communicated to local Clinical Governance Units. 

Maternity services should monitor the COVID-19 transmission risk level and respond according to CEC COVID-19 Infection Prevention and Control Manual.  For the most up to date information on the transmission risk in healthcare settings within NSW, view the Risk Monitoring Dashboard

Wherever possible a woman should be facilitated to have one person who is a participant in her care to be with her during labour, birth and the early postnatal period. A participant in care can be described as someone actively providing care, physical and/ or emotional support. Having a trusted birth partner as a participant in care is known to make a significant difference to the safety and wellbeing of women during labour and birth. The woman should be supported to nominate one person to participate in her care during her labour, birth and the early postnatal period. In most circumstances this should be the same person.

The nominated participant in care should be risk assessed prior to attendance at a healthcare facility. The participant in care should not be a person who is in self-isolation under a Public Health Order i.e. has suspected or confirmed COVID-19 or who is a close or casual contact and waiting for test results. Women should be made aware of this requirement antenatally and advised to identify an alternative participant in care in case this situation arises for them.

If a woman has suspected or confirmed COVID-19 or is a close or casual contact and waiting for test results, then an individualised plan will be required for the provision of support during her labour and birth. This should include consideration of her individual circumstances and the planned mode of birth. It is important to consider the risk of transmission to the participant in care during this episode of care and provide clear information to the woman and her nominated person. The participant in care should consider their own individual health risk factors including their own COVID-19 vaccination status. Participants in care will be required to wear PPE and follow guidance from staff while in the birthing environment .

For women who have suspected or confirmed COVID-19, any participant in care who is present during labour, birth or hospital attendance/ stay would be considered as a close contact under the current NSW Health definition unless they have had COVID-19 in the past 6 months and have fully recovered.  Being a close contact requires ongoing consideration of testing and isolation. Please also refer to Self-isolation rules | NSW Government

Clear communication should be made with the woman prior to her attending the healthcare facility. This will include planning for her to be met on arrival at the facility and escorted to the relevant department when attendance is required. Consideration should be given locally, for the provision of continuous support in the birth room, throughout labour and birth, for those women who do not have a participant in care with them.

Virtual care, also known as telehealth, safely connects patients with health professionals to deliver care when and where it is needed can replace some antenatal appointments where physical examination is not required.

It is important to maintain high testing rates to identify as many pregnant women and their partners who are confirmed COVID-19 positive as quickly as possible. They should be encouraged to get tested if they meet the criteria for testing before coming into a healthcare facility. This should be discussed at every visit.

When community transmission is high additional COVID-19 testing may be required.

When mothers, babies/families are separated/ isolated for any reason staff should acknowledge that this may be a trigger for anxiety. This may be an especially difficult time for Aboriginal families and refugees. Staff will need to identify mothers and families that may require additional support on referral or early intervention. Staff will need to partner quickly with appropriate local support, for example Aboriginal liaison officers, Aboriginal health workers, multicultural health staff, and social work. Staff should seek advice from clinical leads to ensure that the best plan for additional support is developed with local resources.

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Table 1: Minimum essential elements for safe maternity care irrespective of the level of risk for community transmission  

Refer to  COVID-19 Infection Prevention and Control Manual  (Chapter 3 - Response and Escalation Framework)

  • First contact / booking in appointment
    • This appointment could be face to face, via virtual care or a combination of both
    • Alternate plans should be considered to provide required booking in paperwork via postage or secure email systems prior to the booking process
    • The booking in and risk stratification process for pregnant women must be done with a clinician (e.g. midwife), even if the process is completed via virtual care
    • Psychosocial screening must be completed via virtual care or in person; domestic violence screening should be deferred to a face to face appointment (noting that: if the domestic violence screen is deferred, it is essential that there is a system in place to flag that this screening should be done at the earliest opportunity)
    • Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk screening must be completed
    • Test results should be given via virtual care or by secure messaging
    • Abnormal results should be given face to face or via secure video
    • Women with vulnerabilities (e.g. culturally and linguistically diverse, Aboriginal, those with mental health or drug and alcohol issues) should not be disadvantaged and all efforts should be made to ensure that services are enhanced to support these populations
    • encourage women to have their COVID-19 and flu vaccinations.

Women with identified risk factors for example, but not limited to, identified COVID-19 infection at any time in pregnancy,  fetal growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth and stillbirth will need increased surveillance according to established care pathways.

  • 20 weeks
    • This appointment could take place over a secure video call or via virtual care, however if significant risk factors have been identified it should be a face to face appointment. There should be an appropriate revision of the care plan if risk factors have been identified
    • Consider offering pertussis vaccinations at this appointment for women at risk of preterm birth.

If a woman has significant maternal/fetal/obstetric conditions such as, concern about fetal movements, antepartum haemorrhage (APH) etc. she should attend the hospital for assessment, irrespective of her COVID-19 status.

  • 28 weeks
    • face to face appointment
    • Comprehensive assessment of maternal and fetal wellbeing (including weight, BP, fundal height measurement, urinalysis and discussion of fetal movements)
    • Domestic violence screening (if previously deferred)
    • Review care plan
    • Review and discuss usual screening investigations e.g. Full Blood Count (FBC), Oral Glucose Tolerance Test
    • Discuss stillbirth prevention strategies (e.g.: encourage women to sleep on their side from 28 weeks)
    • Review and discuss usual vaccinations:, example: seasonal flu and pertussis and COVID-19 vaccinations
    • Offer Anti-D for Rhesus negative women
    • The woman should consider who will be her participant in care during her labour, birth and the postnatal period.

Women with identified risk factors for example, but not limited to, identified COVID-19 infection at any time in pregnancy, fetal growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth and stillbirth will need increased surveillance according to established care pathways.

  • 36 weeks
    • face to face appointments
    • comprehensive assessment of maternal and fetal wellbeing (including weight, BP, fundal height measurement, urinalysis and discussion of fetal movements)
    • check fetal presentation (using point of care ultrasound if available)
    • review care plan
    • review and discuss usual screening tests e.g. FBC, GBS swab
    • review Anti-D prophylaxis for Rhesus negative women (if not received at 34 weeks, then offer at 36 weeksi)

Women with identified risk factors for example, but not limited to,  identified COVID-19 infection at any time in pregnancy, fetal growth restriction, pre-eclampsia, preterm birth and stillbirth will need increased surveillance according to established care pathways.

  • 40 – 41 weeks
    • face to face appointment
    • comprehensive assessment of maternal and fetal wellbeing (including weight, BP, fundal height, urinalysis and discussion of fetal movements)
    • check fetal presentation (using point of care ultrasound if available)
    • review care plan.
If a woman has significant maternal/ fetal/ obstetric conditions such as, concern about fetal movements, antepartum haemorrhage (APH) etc. she should attend the hospital for assessment, irrespective of her COVID-19 status.
 
  • Postnatal
    • following birth, a postnatal risk assessment should be performed including VTE assessment and the specific care needs for women with vulnerabilities (e.g. mental health, substance use etc.)
    • risk assessment should be attended daily for women receiving postnatal care in the community; the usual COVID-19 screening approach should be adopted and management planning adapted depending on responses.
    • The following are essentials of care:
      • Appropriate vaccination for both mother and baby
      • Anti-D
      • vitamin K
      • physical assessment of well neonate
      • newborn blood spot screening
      • SWISH screen
      • newborn cardiac screen
      • maternal physical and mental health assessment
      • referral to Child and Family Health
    • extended length of stay in hospital is still appropriate for women with complex needs
    • comprehensive advice around breastfeeding and postnatal care. 

Recommendations for COVID-19 surveillance testing

 COVID-19 Surveillance testing may be required in a number of maternity and newborn care settings. Please refer to the CEC guidance Recommendations for COVID Surveillance Testing in NSW Healthcare Facilities for up to date information

COVID-19 infection status of women and recommended service provision

The utmost priority is the immediate medical needs of the pregnant woman and her baby. There should be no delay providing optimal care for the woman or her baby regardless of the woman's COVID-19 status, vaccination status or whether the woman and her family reside in areas with high prevalence of COVID-19.

Clinicians should refer to the CDNA National Guidelines for Public Health Units for risk assessment protocols and case definitions to determine the woman's COVID-19 status. Women who do not fit all the criteria for a suspected or confirmed case should be treated as low risk for COVID-19, noting that women residing in LGAs with high prevalence of COVID-19 will be subject to the Public Health Order of the day. This may include increased testing.  

The CDNA National Guidelines for Public Health Units also cover the recommended management of individuals (such as pregnant women) who are close contacts of confirmed cases of COVID-19. As per this advice, if individuals in self-isolation need to see a health care provider, they should telephone their GP, hospital Emergency Department or maternity unit before presenting.

Clinicians should refer to the CDNA National Guidelines for Public Health Unitsfor risk assessment protocols and case definitions to determine the woman's COVID-19 status. Women who do not fit all the criteria for a suspected or confirmed case should be treated as low risk for COVID-19, noting that women residing in LGAs with high prevalence of COVID-19 will be subject to the Public Health Order of the day. This may include increased testing.   

The CDNA National Guidelines for Public Health Units also cover the recommended management of individuals (such as pregnant women) who are close contacts of confirmed cases of COVID-19. As per this advice, if individuals in self-isolation need to see a health care provider, they should telephone their GP, hospital Emergency Department or maternity unit before presenting.

Table 2: COVID-19 infection status of women and recommended service provision

All service provision must take into account the additional considerations related to the COVID-19 risk level.

Antenatal

 
Issue Women who are NOT suspected or confirmed cases of COVID – 19 Women who are suspected or confirmed cases of COVID – 19

Early pregnancy services

 

  • continue usual service provision

 

  • triage using virtual care
  • prioritise women's care based on clinical need
Antenatal education

Antenatal classes

  • will be virtual during periods of high transmission risk level (RED ALERT).

  • may be face to face following risk assessment (Amber Alert) with appropriate precautions

  • face to face following COVID-19 screening questions (Green Alert) with appropriate precautions.

  • provide using online platforms

Antenatal Appointments  partner/ support person

 

 

A partner/support person
  • will not be able to attend in person for routine antenatal appointments during periods of high transmission risk level (RED ALERT).
  • May be able to attend following risk assessment (Amber Alert) with appropriate precautions.
  • will be able to attend if they meet the COVID-19 screening questions (Green Alert) with appropriate precautions

Alternative communication methods should be utilised to involve the partner/support person during appointments if they are unable to attend.

Compassionate considerations need to be made where specific circumstances mean a woman may require her partner or support person to be present during an antenatal appointment. These needs should be identified early, and care planned appropriately.

  • a partner/support person will not be able to attend appointments regardless of the transmission risk level.
  • alternative communication methods should be utilised to involve the partner/support person during appointments.
  • compassionate considerations need to be made where specific circumstances mean a woman may require her partner or support person to be present during an antenatal appointment. These needs should be identified early and care planned appropriately.

Ultrasound

scans

  • continue usual practice

NOTE - women who have recovered from COVID -19 require increased fetal surveillance

  • triage using virtual care noting recommendations for increased fetal surveillance
  • prioritise based on clinical need
Care for women with co-morbidities
  • prioritise face to face consultation for women based on clinical need

 

  • triage using virtual care 
  • prioritise face to face consultation for women based on clinical need
Gestational diabetes
Vaccinations (other than COVID-19)
  • continue usual practice of promoting recommended vaccinations

 

 

  • delay until clinically appropriate and opportunistically when woman attends next face to face appointment
Mental health assessment and support
  • staff to assess the psychosocial wellbeing and support needs of the woman at every appointment
  • make appropriate referrals
  • staff to assess the psychosocial wellbeing and support needs of the woman at every appointment
  • make appropriate referrals
Maternal Transfer
  • continue usual service provision.
  • prior to transfer, the COVID-19 status of the mother should be clarified by the referring hospital.
  • continue usual service provision with consideration of recommended COVID-19 surveillance testing.

 

Antenatal admission       

 

 

    A partner/support person
  • May be able to attend following risk assessment (Red and Amber Alert) with appropriate precautions
  • Will be able to attend if they meet the COVID-19 screening questions (Green Alert) with appropriate precautions

For current information please refer to Chapter 2 of the CEC COVID-19 IPAC Manual

  • Considerations need to be made where specific circumstances mean a woman may require her partner or support person to be present during her hospital stay.
  • Other circumstances requiring compassionate consideration include prolonged antenatal admissions. Specific considerations may be required including effects on a woman's' mental health and also when women have been geographically displaced for their care. 
  • Consider alternatives to communication to maintain social connections whilst the woman is in hospital.
  • During periods of high transmission risk level (RED ALERT) there are restrictions for hospital visitors.
  • for current information please refer to chapter 3 of the CEC COVIDCOVID-19 IPAC Manual
  • considerations need to be made where specific circumstances mean a woman may require her partner or support person to be present during her hospital stay.
  • other circumstances requiring compassionate consideration include prolonged antenatal admissions. Specific considerations may be required including effects on a woman’s’ mental health and also when women have been geographically displaced for their care
  • consider alternatives to communication to maintain social connections whilst the woman is in hospital

Intrapartum

 
Issue Women who are NOT suspected or confirmed cases of COVID – 19 Women who are suspected or confirmed cases of COVID – 19
Public Homebirth
  • local decision based on local prevalence
  • not recommended 
  • transfer care to hospital birth unit for continuous Electronic Fetal Monitoring.
Maternal and fetal clinical assessment including continuous electronic fetal monitoring
  • continue usual clinical practice

Note - Women who have recovered from COVID-19 are recommended to have continuous electronic fetal monitoring

  • on admission, a full maternal and fetal assessment should be undertaken, including assessment of severity of COVID-19 symptoms, maternal observation, confirmation of onset of labour and assessment of fetal welfare via electronic fetal monitoring. Continuous electronic fetal monitoring should continue throughout labour.
  • inform relevant staff of the admission of the woman.
Maternal Observations in labour
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • usual clinical practice plus oxygen saturation monitoring.
Staff numbers at procedures
  • minimise number of staff
  • continue to support students where appropriate.
  • minimise number of staff and consider a buddy system.
  • local decision regarding student involvement.

Participant in care

One nominated partner/ support person should be permitted to be with a pregnant woman during labour and birth, to act as a participant in care

 

 

A partner/support person

  • May be able to attend following risk assessment (Red and Amber Alert)
  • Local decisions will determine the number of support persons to attend if they meet the COVID-19 screening questions (Green Alert)
  • women may have individual compassionate and cultural needs that should be locally managed through appropriate assessment and planning to support the woman at this important time.

 

 

  • One nominated partner/ support person should be permitted to be with a pregnant woman during labour and birth, to act as a participant in care.
  • consideration should be given locally, for the provision of continuous support in the birth room, throughout labour and birth. This should include supporting the woman to identify a suitable participant in care who is not in self-isolation under a Public Health Order i.e. does not have suspected or confirmed COVID-19 and who is not a close or casual contact waiting for test results.   
  • women may have individual compassionate and cultural needs that should be locally managed through appropriate assessment and planning to support the woman at this important time
  • consider alternatives to facilitate communication, connections and involvement of a participant in care during labour and birth where possible including using virtual platforms e.g. Video call via a mobile phone  
Water immersion
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • not recommended
Water birth 
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • not recommended

 

Fetal blood sample or fetal scalp electrodes
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • continue usual clinical practice
Nitrous oxide
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • it is important to undertake a comprehensive assessment of each woman and to provide her with the information she needs to make informed decisions including the most appropriate pain relief for her individual situation.
  • entonox can be used with a single-patient viral/microbiological filter that performs at or above 99.997% efficiency.
  • check with the nitrous oxide equipment manufacturer to determine if there are recommendations for filters to be added into an individual delivery system in relation to COVID-19. The make, model, other associated parts and delivery systems will be different across NSW hospitals.
Epidural
  • continue usual clinical practice

 

  • an early epidural should be recommended in labour particularly for women with acute respiratory symptoms, to minimise the need for general anaesthesia if urgent intervention for birth is needed.
Mode of birth
  • Continue usual clinical practice

 

  • shared decision making, considering the maternal and fetal clinical condition
Placenta
  • continue usual disposal
  • Women who have recovered from COVID-19 should have placental histopathological investigation in line with Maternity - Indications for Placental Histological Examination GL2014_006
Delayed cord clamping
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • for term infants, shared decision making with the woman.
  • for preterm infants delayed cord clamping remains a recommended practice.
Skin to skin contact
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • continue to offer to well women provided their baby is also well. Babies are at risk of infection from a woman's respiratory secretions after birth. Respiratory hygiene measures for the mother - including wearing a face mask and washing hands before holding the baby.
Neonatal team at birth
  • the neonatal paediatric team should only attend the birth as clinically required
Newborn resuscitation
  • continue usual clinical practice

Postnatal

Issue Women who are NOT sustpected or confirmed cases of COVID-19 Women who are suspected or confirmed cases of COVID-19
Keeping mothers and babies together, including in Recovery Unit
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • mother and baby may stay together where clinically appropriate irrespective of COVID-19 risk level as per CEC COVID-19 Infection Prevention and Control Manual
    (Chapter 3) – Response and Escalation Framework.
Transferring babies between areas/wards
  • follow current local procedures
Breastfeeding
  • Continue usual clinical practice
  • support maternal feeding preferences; encourage breastfeeding and expressing breast milk
  • babies are at risk of infection from a woman's respiratory secretions after birth. The woman and support person who was present at birth should practice hand and respiratory hygiene and wear a face mask during feeding or other close mother-baby interactions.
  • further advice about breastfeeding and expressing can be found at NSW Health Guidance on Infant Feeding 
Expressed breast milk (EBM)
  • continue usual clinical practice
Newborn blood spot screening
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • continue usual clinical practice
Cord blood collection and donation
  • continue usual clinical practice
  • private cord blood banking should be managed in line with contractor management .
  • family cord blood collection and donation should be managed through a risk assessment process and in accordance with local protocols.
​Participant in care

For current information please refer to chapter 3 of the CEC COVID-19-IPAC-manual

A participant in care (partner/support person

  • May be able to attend following risk assessment during Red and Amber Alert status
  • Local decisions will determine the number of support persons to attend if they meet the COVID-19 screening questions during a Green Alert status.
  • ​One nominated participant in care should be permitted to be with a woman on the postnatal ward.
Visitors to the postnatal ward

  • For current information please refer to chapter 3 of the CEC COVID-19-IPAC-manual
  • Visitors to Postnatal ward:
  • May be restricted during a Red Alert status.
  • During an Amber Alert status risk screening questions will be asked prior to entry to facilities and the number of visitors may be limited  locally.  Visitors must wear a mask before entering the facility.
  • Local decisions will determine the number of visitors to  attend if they meet the COVID-19 risk screening questions during a Green Alert status.
  • Consider alternatives to communication including video calls to maintain social connections while the woman is in hospital.
  • For current information please refer to chapter 3 of the CEC COVID-19-IPAC-manual
  • children/siblings under 12 will not be able to visit a woman during the postnatal stay unless there are exceptional circumstances that require individual consideration.
  • consider alternatives to communication including video calls to maintain social connections while the woman is in hospital.
Postnatal care
  • usual clinical practice
  •  VTE prophylaxis indicated
Discharge planning
  • usual clinical practice
  • women should be advised that they should never share a sleep surface with their baby if either parent is under the influence of alcohol, drugs or if overly tired.
  • usual clinical practice
  • mother and baby should continue/complete the recommended period of quarantine after discharge based on advice from an Infectious Diseases specialist.
  • provide advice about when to seek assistance
  • notify community health care providers
  • women should be advised that they should never share a sleep surface with their baby if either parent is under the influence of alcohol, drugs or if overly tired. COVID-19 can lead to significant fatigue.
  • refer to NSW Health Guidance for Neonatal Services
Home visiting
Neonatal referral, assessment or hospital
re-admission
  • usual clinical practice
  • parents should be advised that if their baby is unwell, for example raised temperature, timely medical assessment needs to occur. Parents should be advised to contact their GP or attend their nearest Emergency Department.
  • refer to NSW Health Guidance for Neonatal Services
  • parents should be advised that if their baby is unwell, for example raised temperature, timely medical assessment needs to occur. Parents should be advised to contact their GP or attend their nearest Emergency Department.
Referral to child and family health
  • usual clinical practice

Midwifery care in the home

              

 

Green Transmission Risk Level Amber Transmission Risk Level Red Transmission Risk Level
For parents and household members WITHOUT suspected or confirmed COVID-19 OR close or casual contacts who are required to self-isolate
  • BOTH parents/carers should be encouraged to participate in the appointment as per usual practice, using standard precautions and physical distancing.

 

  • universal surgical mask use for staff.  
  • parents/carers to wear surgical or own approved cloth mask at their own discretion.
  • BOTH parents/carers should be encouraged to participate in the appointment as per usual practice, using standard precautions and physical distancing. 
  • universal surgical mask use for staff.
  • parents/carers to wear surgical or own approved cloth mask at their own discretion.
  • BOTH parents/carers should be encouraged to participate in the appointment as per usual practice, using standard precautions and physical distancing. 

When risk assessment identifies a parent or household member WITH suspected or confirmed COVID-19 OR they are a or casual contact and are required to self-isolate

 

  • surgical mask recommended for parents/carers.
  • staff to wear a P2/N95 respirator and eye protection. 
  • the household member should remain in a different room to the heath care workers .
  • surgical mask for both parents/carers.
  • staff to wear a P2/N95 respirator and eye protection. 
  • the household member should remain in a different room to the heath care workers.
  • surgical mask for both parents/carers. 
  • staff to wear a P2/N95 respirator and eye protection. 
  • the household member should remain in a different room to the heath care workers.

 

Issue Women who are NOT suspected or confirmed cases of COVID – 19 Women who are suspected or confirmed cases of COVID – 19
Neonatal referral, assessment or hospital re-admission
  • Usual clinical practice
  • Parents should be advised that if their baby is unwell, for example raised temperature, timely medical assessment needs to occur. Parents should be advised to contact their GP or attend their nearest Emergency Department.
  • Refer to: NSW Health Guidance for Neonatal Services
  • Parents should be advised that if their baby is unwell, for example raised temperature, timely medical assessment needs to occur. Parents should be advised to contact their GP or attend their nearest Emergency Department
Referral to Child and Family Health
  • Usual clinical practice

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Document information

Developed by

Health and Social Policy Branch (HSPB), NSW Ministry of Health.

Consultation

  • COP Maternity Working Group
  • CEC Infection Prevention and Control Team

Reviewed

For use by

Maternity and newborn services.


Current as at: Wednesday 22 December 2021
Contact page owner: Health Protection NSW