Alert: Routine vaccine deliveries delayed

Toll Group has experienced IT system issues which have affected the NSW State Vaccine Centre warehouse systems. Routine orders placed from 1 May 2020 are being processed manually and will be delivered as soon as possible.

 

Urgent lifesaving vaccines for rabies post exposure prophylaxis and outbreak management are not affected.

 

Please visit the NSW State Vaccine Centre online ordering webpage for regular updates.

Over 2.7 million doses of government-funded influenza vaccines have been delivered in NSW

  • Deliveries of government-funded influenza vaccines commenced on 30 March 2020.
  • As of 25 May, a record 2.77 million doses have been delivered to immunisation providers in NSW compared to 2.1 million doses at the same time in 2019 and 2.5 million doses for the whole of the 2019 flu season.
  • 1.34 million doses have been delivered for people aged 65 years and over in NSW.
  • Immunisation providers should visit the State Vaccine Centre online ordering webpagefor regular vaccine supply updates to assist in planning future influenza vaccination clinics. 
  • Find your nearest immunisation provider with influenza vaccine in stock, noting that:
    • different vaccines are recommended for people based on age (see 'Influenza Vaccines' below)
    • it is recommended that you call ahead to make an appointment and make sure there is influenza vaccine in stock for you as stock levels may change frequently

Graph: Cumulative influenza vaccine distribution in NSW, 2016 to 2020

Note: Vaccine distribution data will be updated weekly.

Ordering influenza vaccine

  • An influenza vaccine ordering worksheet is available to help clinics to calculate how many vaccines are required.
  • Vaccination clinics should only be scheduled once vaccine has been received.
  • Influenza vaccine can be ordered online at https://nsw.tollhealthcare.com.
  • Please ensure that your free influenza vaccines are only given to eligible people (see advice below).

Expert advice about influenza vaccination

The Australian Government Chief Medical Officer (CMO) and the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI) have provided advice on 2020 National Immunisation Program seasonal influenza vaccination that covers what's new in 2020, including two new influenza vaccines, timing of influenza vaccination, influenza vaccination for pregnant women and eligibility for influenza vaccines funded by the National Immunisation Program.
 
The National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS) has developed a factsheet responding to frequently asked questions about influenza vaccine.
 

Vaccine strains

The Australian Influenza Vaccine Committee recommendation for the composition of influenza vaccines for Australia in 2020 introduces three new strains when compared to the composition of the trivalent and quadrivalent vaccines for Australia in 2019: a new A (H1N1) like virus strain, a new A (H3N2) like virus strain and new strain for the B Victoria lineage.
 
Quadrivalent influenza vaccines:
  • an A/Brisbane/02/2018 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus
  • an A/South Australia/34/2019 (H3N2)-like virus
  • a B/Washington/02/2019-like (B/Victoria lineage) virus
  • a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like (B/Yamagata lineage) virus

Eligibility for free influenza vaccine

Free seasonal influenza vaccine is funded for the following groups at higher risk of complications from influenza:
 
  • all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged 6 months and over
  • all children aged 6 months to less than 5 years of age (including Aboriginal and medically at risk)
  • all individuals aged 5 years and over with medical risk conditions, namely:
    • cardiac disease, including cyanotic congenital heart disease, coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure
    • chronic respiratory conditions, including suppurative lung disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and severe asthma
    • other chronic illnesses requiring regular medical follow up or hospitalisation in the previous year, including diabetes mellitus, chronic metabolic diseases, chronic renal failure, and haemoglobinopathies
    • chronic neurological conditions that impact on respiratory function, including multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injuries, and seizure disorders
    • impaired immunity, including HIV, malignancy and chronic steroid use
    • children aged 6 months to 10 years on long term aspirin therapy
  • pregnant women (influenza vaccine can be given at any stage of pregnancy)
  • people aged 65 years and over (vaccine that is specifically designed to produce a higher immune response is available for this group).

Influenza vaccines

Five free vaccines will be available in 2020:
For further information please refer to the influenza vaccine information sheet developed to assist providers with managing the various influenza vaccine presentations and eligibility for each vaccine.
Page Updated: Monday 25 May 2020
Contact page owner: Immunisation