23 August 2019
NSW Health is urging people to vaccinate against measles before overseas travel after two NSW residents contracted the disease in South America and New Zealand.

Dr Vicky Sheppeard, Director Communicable Diseases NSW Health, said after their return to Australia, both cases visited several locations in Sydney while infectious. 

“Anyone who was in the same locations as the cases should be alert for signs and symptoms of measles until 8 September,” Dr Sheppeard said.

The cases visited the following locations at the following times while infectious.

Thursday 15 August
•           Train from Hazelbrook to Central at 7:15am (last carriage)
•           Train from Central to Wynyard arriving at around 9:00am 
•           Plus Fitness gym, AON Tower, 201 Kent Street, Noon to 1:00pm
•           International Towers Sydney, Tower 2, 200 Barangaroo Avenue, Barangaroo 
•           Pharmacy 4 Less Late Night Chemist, 171 Pacific Highway Hornsby, 3:30pm-4:00pm
•           Chef’s Noodle Hornsby, 175 Peats Ferry Rd Hornsby 3:30pm-4:00pm
•           Train from Wynyard to Central departing at 5:00pm 
•           Train from Central to Hazelbrook departing at 5:17pm (first carriage)

Friday 16 August
•           Train from Hazelbrook to Central at 7:15am (last carriage)
•           Train from Central to Wynyard arriving at around 9am
•           Plus Fitness gym, AON Tower, 201 Kent Street, Noon to 1:00pm
•           International Towers Sydney, Tower 2, 200 Barangaroo Avenue, Barangaroo
•           Hornsby Westfield, Seafood@Hornsby and the food court, at lunchtime
•           Train from Wynyard to Central departing at 5:00pm
•           Train from Central to Hazelbrook departing at 5:17pm (first carriage)

Monday 19 August
•           Hazelbrook shops, including IGA and the pharmacy, mid-morning

“None of the locations visited by these two people pose an ongoing risk,” Dr Sheppeard said. 

It can take up to 18 days for symptoms to appear following exposure to a person with measles. 

“Symptoms to watch out for include fever, sore eyes and a cough followed three or four days later by a red, blotchy rash that spreads from the head to the rest of the body,” Dr Sheppeard said.

“Anyone who develops symptoms of measles should phone their GP to ensure they don’t wait alongside other patients before seeing their doctor.”

Both cases are in their forties – one was unvaccinated and the other reported receiving one dose of the measles vaccine as a child. The two adults remain isolated in hospital for management of complications of their infection.