Joint research initiatives with the NSW Ministry of Health are most successful when all partners are involved early in the development of the research proposal and when partner contributions are clearly defined.

While there are a range of research partnerships, this page highlights issues for external partners to consider when entering into formal partnerships for research gran​ts involving the NSW Ministry of Health.

Why is partnership important?​

  • There is evidence that interaction between researchers, policy makers and practitioners is likely to increase the use of research.
  • In particular, ​co-production of research - where policy makers are involved in developing research questions, undertaking the research, interpreting the findings, and disseminating the results - is likely to produce more policy-relevant and practice-relevant research, and have a greater impact on policy.

Types of research grant partnerships

  • Funding structures involving co-sponsorship have the potential to promote partnerships between policy makers and researchers and to increase motivation for linkage and exchange more generally.
  • Grant schemes that require both researcher and practitioner involvement include:
    • NHMRC Partnership Projects
    • NHMRC Partnership Centres
    • ARC Linkage Projects.
  • Other grant schemes that require consideration of the translation of research evidence into policy and practice include:
    • NHMRC Centres of Research Excellence
    • NHMRC Project Grants
    • NHMRC Program Grants.

What should researchers consider when approaching the Ministry to be a research grant partner?

  • How does the intended research grant topic align with the key research priorities of the Ministry?
  • Have you approached the potential research grant partner(s) within the Ministry, before developing the proposal, to ensure they have ample opportunity to contribute to the proposal?
  • Have you clarified what you expect of the Ministry as a research grant partner, for example: financial and/or in-kind contributions; access to program, administrative or survey data; epidemiological or biostatistical expertise; policy expertise?
  • Will the research strengthen existing links with the Ministry, outside of the grant proposal, or establish a new relationship with the Ministry? Ongoing links with the Ministry will enhance this and future proposals.
  • How will the evidence generated by the research impact upon health policy, services or programs?
  • Beyond the publication of results, have you considered ways to facilitate the translation of the research evidence into policy and practice?

For further information contact:

The Director
Evidence and Evaluation Unit
Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence
NSW Ministry of Health
Ph: (02) 9391 9292
Email: MOH-EEB@health.nsw.gov.au​

Page Updated: Wednesday 15 August 2018