Caring for a partner when they are not well can be stressful and sometimes lonely. Hear real stories from dads who coped with their partner’s perinatal mental health issues and how they got through it.​​​​​​​​​​​​​

It's OK to ask for help

"My wife couldn't answer properly and I had no choice but to leave her in hospital to get better. All of a sudden people were asking me everything."  It’s a steep learning curve looking after baby 24/7. It’s ok to ask for help. ​​

Supporting yourself

"I felt angry constantly ... I felt really isolated from Alisha and the baby, our son." Sometimes coping with everything can get on top of us. Listen to why it’s important to look after your own wellbeing. ​

Supporting your partner

"The midwives have taught me ways to support her without trying to fix her ... things can get better but getting better doesn't have a time limit." Getting counselling and working together helped for this dad with his first child. Now he has three.

Caring for your baby

Do you ever wish you could know what your baby is thinking? Hear first hand how important infant-father relationships are and what you can do to better bond with your baby. 

When your partner needs hospital care

"She never felt she was getting the hang of it. It just didn't get better." Making choices about hospital admissions can be really tough, especially if the baby can't be admitted as well. It can feel like letting our partner down even when it’s for the best. ​​

Holding it all together

"I felt like it was up to me to fix it but I couldn't. We needed help." Looking after you partner and your baby can be hard work. Hear one dad talk about the pressure he felt to hold it all together, when his partner was unwell, and how he managed.

Our family's journey to recovery

Hear one family's journey through perinatal mental illness from the dad's perspective.


 

​​Although this resource is aimed at dads, the information is helpful for all new parents and carers regardless of gender, who are coping with perinatal mental illness.

Current as at: Friday 21 August 2020
Contact page owner: Mental Health Branch